Maarten Vanden Eynde

detail of bottom - Art Brussels, Belgium (2010) (Photo: Philippe De Gobert)

detail of bottom - Art Brussels, Belgium (2010) (Photo: Philippe De Gobert)

Historiography is inherently subjective. History is made, told, and retold by individuals whose memories may be selective and who may have an interest in manipulating or warping our perception of events so that we can never really be sure where truth lies. What we can be sure of, however, is that when reconstructing the past mistakes are constantly made, because the information available (which may be incomplete or biased) demands degrees of interpretation and speculation.

'IKEA Vase' is an amphora-shaped vessel made of restoration paste and incorporating the fragments of an IKEA mug. Given the unimaginable quantity of IKEA products that are spread all over the globe and the proven ability of ceramics to withstand the passing of time rather well, there are bound to be material leftovers of these mass-produced consumer goods in future geological strata. The work questions the capacity of historical artefacts to give an accurate impression of what life in an inherently unknowable past would have been like. Through this process it points out the hypothetically fallacious impressions a future archaeologist might formulate about our present, based on its surviving remnants.